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Editorial calendar

Learn more about us, our audience and our various article types.

2017SeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryFebruary


September 2017

Pharmaceutical Journal: Feature

  • Novel drug delivery methods. This feature will look at four promising novel drug delivery methods in development.
  • Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease was named in 1817; however, 200 years on there still isn’t a cure. Current treatments reduce the impact that symptoms have on daily life but they do not stop their progression. The goal of most research being conducted on Parkinson’ disease is ultimately focused on finding a cure, but there is a high failure rate for Parkinson’s drugs which puts pharmaceutical companies off investing in research – leaving universities without the investment they require to progress. Will this be the last major anniversary we acknowledge with regards to Parkinson’s disease?

Pharmaceutical Journal: Infographic

  • Oral contraceptives. This double-page spread will celebrate 60 years of the contraceptive pill.

Pharmaceutical Journal: Comment

  • Antimicrobial resistance. The role measurement can play in tackling antimicrobial resistance and the complexities involved.

October 2017

Pharmaceutical Journal: Feature

  • Non-invasive glucose monitoring. There are several sites being targeted for non-invasive glucose monitoring: eyes, fingertip, earlobe, sweat and saliva. Approaches include contact lenses, passing light (visible, infrared or other) through the skin to detect glucose and even salivary assessments. Based on interviews with relevant experts/developers, discuss the different approaches and the various technologies being developed for each. How do they work and what are the challenges in achieving accuracy? Are they likely to be more acceptable than current techniques for monitoring glucose levels?
  • Acne. Acne affects around 650m people worldwide but there have been few novel products launched over the past 10 years. Recently, there have been several late-stage failures in what was considered to be a promising pipeline of emerging treatments for acne. What next for drug development in this area?

Pharmaceutical Journal: Comment

  • New medical supplies act. Opinion piece from lawyer on how the new medical supplies act works and will impact pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry.

Pharmaceutical Journal: Learning

  • Children. Communicating with parents about their children’s medications.

Clinical Pharmacist: Insight

  • Sexual health. Laura Waters, sexual health consultant, writes about the worrying rise of STIs in England, the reasons behind the increase and what healthcare professionals can do.

November 2017

Pharmaceutical Journal: Feature

  • The role of pharmacists in mental health.
  • Smart insulin. To keep glucose levels within the desired range, people with type 1 diabetes have to inject insulin after each meal, with the dose depending on how many carbohydrates they have consumed. Smart insulin, which automatically responds to blood glucose levels, could mean an end to all of this, with insulin only needing to be injected once a day. Several different approaches to developing glucose-responsive insulin are being investigated by companies and academic groups, ranging from a smart insulin patch (UNC/NC State) to glucose-sensing nanoparticles (Monash University).

Pharmaceutical Journal: Comment

  • PILs and PLCs. WHy PILS and SPCs are not fit for purpose and need an overhaul, by Theo Raynor.

Pharmaceutical Journal: Learning

  • Dentures. Advising patients with dentures in community pharmacy.

Clinical Pharmacist: Insight

  • Health literacy. Highlighting the health literacy problem (in developed countries such as UK, Europe and US) and what we can do to close the gap.

December 2017

Pharmaceutical Journal: Feature

  • Four nations. This feature will compare how community pharmacy has progressed in each of the four countries of the UK, and why there are differences.
  • Artificial intelligence in drug development. Several start-ups are using AI algorithms in drug discovery to find targets and drug molecules, and develop lead candidates. Should we take this seriously or is it just another fleeting fad?

Pharmaceutical Journal: Feature

  • Update on decriminalisation of dispensing errors. David Reissner provides an update on the road to decriminalising dispensing errors - and explains why everything has come to a halt.

Pharmaceutical Journal: Learning

  • Smoking cessation.

Clinical Pharmacist: Insight

  • Sugar.

January 2018

Pharmaceutical Journal: Feature

  • Access to records. Pharmacists in the UK have been campaigning to get read and write access to shared patient records for over a decade, and various pilots have taken place. But access to the full patient record remains elusive. How have pharmacists in other countries fared and are there lessons to be learned?
  • Canadian pharmacy initiative. The Pharmacists Clinic at the University of British Columbia is Canada’s first university-affiliated, licensed, pharmacist-led clinic, and opened in April 2014. What can the UK learn from this model? Would it work within the constraints of the UK educational and health systems?Canadian pharmacy initiative.

Pharmaceutical Journal: Comment

  • Chief pharmaceutical officer of Scotland. Opinion piece from Rose Marie Parr, chief pharmaceutical officer of Scotland on the next steps for pharmacy in Scotland (update on Prescription for Excellence).

Pharmaceutical Journal: Learning

  • Menopause. Treatment options for menopausal symptoms.

Clinical Pharmacist: Insight

  • Suicide prevention. What can pharmacists do to help those at risk of suicide?

February 2018

Pharmaceutical Journal: Feature

  • Adherence. According to the WHO “improving adherence would have a greater impact on health than any potential discovery in medicine” and yet it continues to be a challenge in healthcare settings. What techniques and technologies are available and currently being developed to help improve adherence and which work best with patients?
  • Immunotherapy for diabetes. Through interviews with the relevant researchers and experts, this feature will discuss the different immunotherapy approaches that have been investigated and the theories for why they have failed in human trials. What new immunotherapy approaches are currently being investigated, and are these more likely to work than previous approaches? What will be the likely challenges? When would this type of therapy be given, how would patients be identified and would therapy be life long?

February 2018

Pharmaceutical Journal: Feature

  • Adherence. According to the WHO “improving adherence would have a greater impact on health than any potential discovery in medicine” and yet it continues to be a challenge in healthcare settings. What techniques and technologies are available and currently being developed to help improve adherence and which work best with patients?

Pharmaceutical Journal: Comment

  • Chief pharmaceutical officer for Wales. Opinion piece from chief pharmaceutical officer of Wales on the next steps for pharmacy in Wales.
  • Care homes. The Vanguard perspective, by Waz Bakhir.

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