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  • Big data concept

    Could big data be the future of pharmacy? Subscription

    The information gleaned from vast amounts of data presents a promising way to maximise the value of medicines, from identifying poor adherence to improving quality of prescribing. Projects in both the UK and the United States are doing just that.

  • Collage of smart inhaler with patient, doctor and mobile devices

    Smart inhalers: will they help to improve asthma care? Subscription

    Smart inhalers use Bluetooth technology to detect inhaler use, remind patients when to take their medication and gather data to help guide care. They have the potential to improve patients’ adherence to asthma therapies and keep their condition under control, but it is clear they need to be designed with health systems and patients in mind so that they can offer maximum benefit.

  • GP out of hours service sign

    New urgent drug supply scheme adds a layer of difficulty Subscription

    The new urgent medicines supply service takes the load off out-of-hours GP services, but adds bureaucracy for patients and pharmacists.

  • Illustration of network of pipes

    Understanding irritable bowel syndrome: bugs, brains and leaky barriers Subscription

    Research indicates that there are multiple causes for the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, and that most of them may involve the microbiome.

  • Illustration of a man trapped in a liquor bottle representing alcohol addiction

    Searching for new medicines to treat alcohol addiction Subscription

    Only a few drugs are licensed to treat alcoholism and, although reasonably effective, they are not suitable for everyone. Increased understanding of the underlying neuroscience of alcohol addiction is revealing a wealth of new possible drug targets, and a number of trials are under way.

  • Micrograph of human skin

    Atopic dermatitis: dupilumab and crisaborole could herald a new era in treatment Subscription

    Atopic dermatitis can have a devastating effect on quality of life, but there have been no major changes to the way it has been treated for over 15 years. Now, two new therapies — dupilumab, a biologic for severe disease, and crisaborole, a topical small molecule drug for milder disease — could herald a new era in the treatment of this distressing condition.

  • Pharmacist and patient in a pharmacy consultation room

    The Murray review: moving in the right direction Subscription

    On 20 December 2016, six days after the long-awaited report by the King’s Fund’s Richard Murray on the provision of clinical services in community pharmacy was published, health minister David Mowat described the review as “an essential road map that sets out how we are going to move the community pharmacy network away from a remuneration model”.

  • Photopharmacology concept with light spectrum and switch

    Photopharmacology: using light to activate drugs Subscription

    Drugs that contain synthetic light-switching molecules could help target therapies to particular parts of the body, limiting side effects. Researchers have started using this approach to tackle blindness, cancer, diabetes, and antibiotic resistance, but questions remain about the clinical practicality of the field.

  • Collage of the key players in the pharmacy funding cuts

    Pharmacy funding cuts: the story so far Subscription

    When the Department of Health revealed in December 2015 that it was planning to cut community pharmacy funding in England by 6%, shockwaves ran through the sector. Now, over a year later, community pharmacies are beginning to feel the impact.

  • Illustration of stem cells

    Stem cells: will they redefine stroke treatment? Subscription

    Researchers are investigating whether stem cells can be used to restore brain tissue and reverse disability in people who have suffered a stroke, or even to stop the damage from happening in the first place. Recent trial results indicate that the field is making progress towards human application.

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