Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

  • 1 of 4

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of infection and inflammation. It is high in bacterial infections but very low or close to zero in viral infections

The protein is made up of five sub-units (monomers) arranged in a ring. The secondary structure of the protein is shown, with beta sheets (arrows) and alpha helices (spirals) connected by linking regions. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a blood plasma protein produced by the liver. It is an acute phase protein, one whose levels rise in response to inflammation. It assists the binding of complement proteins to foreign or damaged cells, an immunological response that destroys the target cells. High blood levels of CRP are associated with increased risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Source  Alfred Pasieka / Science Photo Library