Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

  • 1 of 1

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the mainstay of antidepressant treatment because of their relatively tolerable side effect profile and safety in overdose compared to other antidepressant classes

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the mainstay of antidepressant treatment because of their relatively tolerable side effect profile and safety in overdose compared to other antidepressant classes. The image, a computer artwork, shows the action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) at a chemical synapse. SSRIs regulate the levels of serotonin (the neurotransmitter that controls our moods) within the nervous system. SSRIs (pink) work at the synapses to block the reuptake of serotonin (orange beads) to the presynaptic cell (top). This increases the amount available to the postsynaptic cell downstream (bottom).

Source  Animated Healthcare Ltd / Science Photo Library