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  • Hand holding vaccine bottle with rhinovirus vaccine (RV14)

    Rhinovirus vaccine development is about more than fighting colds Subscription

    8 JUN 2017 By Brian Owens

    Rhinovirus, the pathogen behind the common cold, can cause severe, acute lung disease in children and those with underlying respiratory conditions. Since the 1970s, vaccine development has been hindered by the presence of numerous virus serotypes and the lack of a good animal model to test vaccine candidates. However, several different research groups are now making good progress on rhinovirus vaccines, using a variety of different techniques.

  • Xray showing chronic oedema in the lower limb

    Chronic oedema: treatment and the impact of prescribed medicines Subscription

    Early diagnosis of lower limb oedema is crucial to prevent early oedema becoming chronic. Pharmacists and other healthcare professionals are ideally placed to identify patients on certain medicines at higher risk of oedema, and should be aware of signs of chronic oedema when assessing patients to allow for prompt referral.

  • Infographic showing the history of sildenafil (Viagra)

    Three decades of Viagra

    25 MAY 2017 By Dawn Connelly

    Sildenafil (Viagra) — the first oral drug for erectile dysfunction to hit the market in 1998 — has been prescribed for more than 64 million men worldwide, and may soon be reclassified as a pharmacy medicine in the UK.

  • Illustration of the blood brain barrier

    A barrier to progress: getting drugs to the brain Subscription

    15 MAY 2017 By Rachel Brazil

    Getting drugs across the blood-brain barrier could be key to developing more successful therapies to treat central nervous system disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, depression and epilepsy. Scientists are investigating a number of ways to achieve this, from using Trojan horses to smuggle drugs across the barrier, to temporary disruption of the barrier using ultrasound, to allow drugs into the brain.

  • Micrograph of Acinetobacter baumannii bacteria

    Ceftazidime-avibactam: a novel cephalosporin/β-lactamase inhibitor Subscription

    Over the past decade, infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms have increased. The limited availability in treatment options for these infections prompted both the UK to create a five-year antimicrobial resistance strategic plan to stimulate the development of new antibiotics, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America to call for ten new antimicrobial agents to be developed by 2020. Ceftazidime-avibactam is a combination of a third-generation ...

  • X-ray of lungs with cystic fibrosis

    Naturally-occurring peptide shows promise for CF treatment Subscription

    18 APR 2017

    Thymosin α1 is found to have strong potential to prevent the progression of cystic fibrosis.

  • Collage of smart inhaler with patient, doctor and mobile devices

    Smart inhalers: will they help to improve asthma care? Subscription

    7 APR 2017 By Dara Mohammadi

    Smart inhalers use Bluetooth technology to detect inhaler use, remind patients when to take their medication and gather data to help guide care. They have the potential to improve patients’ adherence to asthma therapies and keep their condition under control, but it is clear they need to be designed with health systems and patients in mind so that they can offer maximum benefit.

  • Illustration of network of pipes

    Understanding irritable bowel syndrome: bugs, brains and leaky barriers Subscription

    16 MAR 2017 By Afsaneh Gray
    Comments (1)

    Research indicates that there are multiple causes for the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, and that most of them may involve the microbiome.

  • Illustration of a man trapped in a liquor bottle representing alcohol addiction

    Searching for new medicines to treat alcohol addiction Subscription

    9 MAR 2017 By Emma Wilkinson
    Comments (1)

    Only a few drugs are licensed to treat alcoholism and, although reasonably effective, they are not suitable for everyone. Increased understanding of the underlying neuroscience of alcohol addiction is revealing a wealth of new possible drug targets, and a number of trials are under way.

  • Micrograph of multiple myeloma tumour cells (green) and bone cells (red) growing on a scaffold made of silk protein (purple), designed to resemble bone material

    Multiple myeloma: pharmacological management Subscription

    9 MAR 2017 By Nick Duncan

    Although multiple myeloma is currently regarded as being incurable in the majority of patients, the outlook for patients diagnosed with the condition has improved markedly over the last 40 years, with survival rates quadrupling. Significant advances in both treatment and supportive therapies have contributed to these improved outcomes and are discussed in this article.

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