Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Antimicrobial resistance

Pharmacists’ skills underused in battle to halt inappropriate antibiotic prescribing, survey suggests

Some 74% of pharmacists think their skills in helping to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing are not being used, according to a survey presented ahead of European Antibiotics Awareness Day. In the image, a pharmacist speaks with customers

Source: Peter Titmuss / Alamy Stock Photo

Community pharmacists want to play a bigger role in reducing inappropriate use of antibiotics 

Around 74% of community pharmacists believe their skills in helping to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing are not being used, according to the results of a survey presented ahead of European Antibiotics Awareness Day on 18 November 2015.

Just under half (46%) of the 214 pharmacists surveyed admit they have no measures in place to tackle the problem, and 83% would like further training to help them develop their skills to address the issue. Around 79% recognised the part they could play in advising patients about the use of antibiotics in tackling respiratory tract infections and 78% felt they also had a role in educating patients about self-care, the survey found.

Some 75% wanted to work more closely with GPs on tackling antibiotic prescribing; 69% said pressure from patients was influencing GPs’ prescribing decisions while 13% pointed to lack of time during the GP patient consultation.

The survey also sought the views of 65 GPs and found that most patient requests for antibiotics (40%) were for respiratory tract infections. Acute coughs and bronchitis were behind 30% of patient requests and 22% of requests were for acute otitis media.

The survey was commissioned by RB, a manufacturer of throat lozenges, and the Global Respiratory Infection Partnership — a group devoted to preventing inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. The results were presented to health professionals and academics who attended a meeting hosted by the two organisations in October 2015 to discuss inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics in primary care.

Citation: The Pharmaceutical Journal DOI: 10.1211/PJ.2015.20200045

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Supplementary images

  • Some 74% of pharmacists think their skills in helping to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing are not being used, according to a survey presented ahead of European Antibiotics Awareness Day. In the image, a pharmacist speaks with customers

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.