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Placebos

Parkinson's patients can be trained to respond to placebo

Placebo administration induced clinical and neuronal responses in Parkinson’s patients taking apomorphine.

Researchersstudied 42 Parkinson's disease patients who had electrodes implanted for deep brain stimulation treatment (x-ray pictured) and found that the initial administration of a placebo produced response

Source: Zephyr / Science Photo Library

Electrodes implanted for deep brain stimulation (pictured) in Parkinson’s patients were used to study how neurons respond to the placebo effect

Placebos elicit well-established responses in Parkinson’s disease (PD), including the release of dopamine in the striatum. However, placebo response is not understood at the single-neuron level.

Researchers from the University of Turin Medical School in Italy studied 42 PD patients who had electrodes implanted for deep brain stimulation treatment. They found that the initial administration of a placebo produced no response.

However, when patients had been administered the anti-Parkinson’s drug apomorphine, subsequent placebo administration induced both clinical and neuronal responses. The strength of these responses increased with each apomorphine dose.

The team, reporting their findings in the Journal of Physiology (online, 9 February 2016)[1], say the results suggest PD patients can be conditioned to respond to placebos. They say this could be used to reduce drug intake, for example, as part of an alternating administration schedule.

Citation: The Pharmaceutical Journal DOI: 10.1211/CP.2016.20200684

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Supplementary images

  • Researchers studied 42 Parkinson's disease patients who had electrodes implanted for deep brain stimulation treatment (x-ray pictured) and found that the initial administration of a placebo produced no response

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