Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Further research required into the use of coerced medication

More research is needed to examine the practice of forcing psychiatricpatients to take their medicines, a study published concludes

More research is needed to examine the practice of forcing psychiatric patients to take their medicines, a study published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing (2008;64:537) concludes.

The authors state that there have been few rigorous investigations into the procedure, which they term coerced medication (CM), and say that further research is needed to more clearly define CM, explore risk assessments and concerns of patients who receive CM and examine possible alternatives.

Earlier and more effective interventions might be useful in minimising the use of CM, and better staff training could help to avoid it, they point out.

David Branford, chief pharmacist at Derbyshire mental health services trust, described the findings as “not very surprising”. He added: “Ultimately, achieving medicines compliance through information, persuasion and insight in always preferable. However, that may not always be achievable.

“For specialist mental health pharmacists understanding the legal framework for coercive treatment is a key aspect of their work as they are often best placed to act as medicines advocates working with other professionals, patients and relatives to achieve the best use of medicines in the most acceptable manner.”

The study revealed that patients receiving CM are most likely to be in their 30s with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or another psychiatric disorder.

Fourteen papers from seven countries published between 1987 and 2004 were analysed, which included interviews with 543 patients and 263 staff and analysis of 1,165 forms and records from the UK, US, Sweden, Finland, Germany, Canada and Denmark.

Citation: The Pharmaceutical Journal URI: 10043391

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 1 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £138.50Buy now
  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 2 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £262.50Buy now
  • Patient Care in Community Practice

    Patient Care in Community Practice

    Patient Care in Community Practice is a unique, practical guide for healthcare professionals or carers. Covers a range of non-medicinal products suitable for use at home.

    £22.00Buy now
  • Clinical Pharmacokinetics

    Clinical Pharmacokinetics

    A practical guide to the use of pharmacokinetic principles in clinical practice. Includes case studies with questions and answers.

    £33.00Buy now
  • Pharmaceutical Toxicology

    Pharmaceutical Toxicology

    Explains the methodology and requirements of pre-clinical safety assessments of new medicines. Includes registration requirements and pharmacovigilance.

    £40.00Buy now

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.