Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Public health

‘Sugar smart’ public health campaign targets children’s sugar intake

A smart phone app that shows users the sugar content of over 75,000 food and drink products has been launched as part of a national public health campaign in England. Image of the campaign pictured

Source: Public Health England / Department of Health

The ‘Sugar smart’ campaign is being promoted under the Change4Life banner

A smartphone app that shows users the sugar content of more than 75,000 food and drink products has been launched as part of a national public health campaign in England.

The ‘Sugar smart’ campaign by Public Health England (PHE) aims to help parents understand the sugar content of the food and drinks they give to their children and provides tips on how to cut down on sugar. The campaign also includes a minute-long video that warns parents that sugar can cause serious tooth decay — the most common reason children are admitted to hospital — and increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers in adulthood.

The initiative, promoted under the Change4Life banner, kicks off with an advertising campaign on 4 January 2015. Five million ‘Sugar smart’ packs will be distributed to primary school age children and a national roadshow is planned. Information about the campaign — including access to the app — is available on the Change4Life website.

According to PHE, on average children aged between four and ten years each consume the equivalent of more than 5,500 sugar cubes annually, which together weigh around 22kg. PHE recommends a daily maximum of 19g of sugar — equal to five sugar cubes — for children aged four to six years, rising to 24g for seven to ten year olds and 30g for children aged over 11 years.

“Children are having too much sugar; three times the maximum recommended amount,” says Alison Tedstone, PHE’s chief nutritionist. “Our easy-to-use app will help parents see exactly where the sugar in their children’s diet is coming from, so they can make informed choices about what to cut down on.”

Citation: The Pharmaceutical Journal DOI: 10.1211/PJ.2016.20200374

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Supplementary images

  • A smart phone app that shows users the sugar content of over 75,000 food and drink products has been launched as part of a national public health campaign in England. Image of the campaign pictured

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.