Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Diabetes

Take an individualised approach to type 2 diabetes, says NICE

Healthcare professionals are being advised to take an individualised approach when treating adults with type 2 diabetes, according guidelines from NICE. In the image, a doctor does a diabetes test with a patient

Source: Phanie / Alamy Stock Photo

Updated NICE guideline recommends that healthcare professionals involve patients in decisions about their blood glucose targets 

Healthcare professionals are being advised to take an individualised approach when treating adults with type 2 diabetes, according to an update of an existing clinical guideline from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), published on 2 December 2015.

This would take into account a patient’s personal preferences, comorbidities, risks from polypharmacy, and their ability to benefit from long‑term interventions because of reduced life expectancy.

NICE also advises that healthcare professionals reassess the patient’s needs and circumstances at each review and “think about whether to stop any medicines that are not effective”. The guideline contains an algorithm to guide healthcare professionals on making decisions on drug therapies.

Healthcare professionals are also being advised to involve patients in decisions about their HbA1c targets (the average amount of glucose in their blood over two to three months). For adults managed either by lifestyle and diet, or by lifestyle and diet combined with a single drug not associated with hypoglycaemia, patients should aim for an HbA1c level of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%), NICE recommends. For adults taking a drug associated with hypoglycaemia, this can rise to an HbA1c level of 53 mmol/mol (7.0%).

NICE recommends that if HbA1c levels are not adequately controlled by a single drug and rise to 58 mmol/mol (7.5%) or higher, clinicians should reinforce advice about diet, lifestyle and adherence to drug treatment and support the person to aim for an HbA1c level of 53 mmol/mol (7.0%) and intensify drug treatment.

Citation: The Pharmaceutical Journal DOI: 10.1211/PJ.2015.20200209

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 2 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £262.50Buy now
  • Pathology and Therapeutics for Pharmacists

    Pathology and Therapeutics for Pharmacists

    An practical, integrated approach to the pathophysiological and pharmacotherapeutic principles underlying the treatment of disease.

    £54.00Buy now
  • Pharmacy Registration Assessment Questions 2

    Pharmacy Registration Assessment Questions 2

    Pharmacy Registration Assessment Questions 2 features more than 400 entirely new, closed book and calculation questions. It can be used in conjunction with the previous volume or on its own. All questions are in line with current GPhC guidance, enabling you to prepare for the pharmaceutical pre-registration exam with confidence.

    £35.00Buy now
  • Pharmacy Registration Assessment Questions 3

    Pharmacy Registration Assessment Questions 3

    Pharmacy Registration Assessment Questions 3 is the third volume in a series that follows on from the previous, highly popular Pharmacy Registration Assessment Questions 2. It features more than 400 entirely new, closed book and calculation questions. It can be used in conjunction with the previous volume or on its own.

    £35.00Buy now

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.