Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Hypertension

Over 25% of hypertensive patients not taking their medicines as directed, research finds

Research has shown that 24% of patients were partially adherent and 2% of patients were fully non-adherent to therapy, in a study of a small patient sample in Ireland.

home blood pressure monitoring

Source: Shutterstock.com

Poorly controlled blood pressure has few symptoms and patients may not be fully aware of the risks, the lead author of the study said.

One in four patients with hypertension are either partially or fully non-adherent to their medication, according to research published in the British Journal of General Practice (30 July 2019).

The researchers set out to examine, for the first time, the feasibility of using mass spectrometry urinalysis to differentiate between patients with treatment-resistant hypertension and those with “pseudo-resistance”, which occurs when non-adherence to medication, white-coat hypertension (WCH), lifestyle and inadequate drug dosing are responsible for their poorly controlled blood pressure.

The study comprised 235 people in Ireland with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension who were either on four blood pressure (BP)-lowering medications or on at least three with raised BP.

The patients underwent mass spectrometry urinalysis to test medicines adherence and ambulatory BP monitoring to examine WCH.

They found that 24% (56) of the 253 patients who underwent the urine analysis were partially adherent and 2% (5) of patients were fully non-adherent to therapy. Combining this result with those who also had ambulatory BP monitoring suggested that 45% of the patients were pseudo-resistant.

“As poorly controlled blood pressure has few symptoms, patients are often not aware of all the risks,” said lead author Peter Hayes, a GP and lecturer at the University of Limerick.

“Many patients intend to take their medication but simply forget to do so; absolute refusal to take medication is rare.

“We believe that consensually checking adherence to medications in patients with poorly controlled blood pressure is a way of opening discussions between doctor and patient about the issue. Both parties can then jointly work to solve the problem.”

Citation: Clinical Pharmacist DOI: 10.1211/PJ.2019.20206876

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 1 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £138.50Buy now
  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 2 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £262.50Buy now
  • Patient Care in Community Practice

    Patient Care in Community Practice

    Patient Care in Community Practice is a unique, practical guide for healthcare professionals or carers. Covers a range of non-medicinal products suitable for use at home.

    £22.00Buy now
  • Pharmaceutical Toxicology

    Pharmaceutical Toxicology

    Explains the methodology and requirements of pre-clinical safety assessments of new medicines. Includes registration requirements and pharmacovigilance.

    £40.00Buy now
  • Strategic Medicines Management

    Strategic Medicines Management

    A practical guide to influencing the availability of medicines, and policies of their use. Focuses on the strategic elements of medicines management.

    £33.00Buy now

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Jobs you might like

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.