Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Novelty Weight Loss

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Losing weight is one of the most popular New Year’s resolutions. Now, everyone wants to lose that little bit here and there no matter at what point of the year so why particularly January 1st? My theory is that there is no point having Christmas if you can’t enjoy all the delicious food, cakes, drinks and snacks and no one wants to be on a diet during the festive season anyway. So, on New Year’s Day everyone is first-footed (a Scottish term) by a dose of guilt that begins the resolution of losing weight. There are so many ways to aid weight-loss, exercising at the gym, undergoing surgery or eating nothing but rabbit food but I am mostly interested in the ‘pharmaceutical’ kind.

               There are many different tablets and pills that are advertised on the internet such as Adios, Alli, Acai berry etc. but do they actually work? The first important thing to note is that they only ‘work’ alongside a calorie controlled diet. So don’t expect any miracles, and don’t think that the ‘reviews’ portion of their websites are necessarily written by actual users. But instead of remaining forever sceptical, we can think about these pills from a pharmaceutical perspective. The first things to look at are the ingredients. The moment you see ‘herbal supplement’ you can forget about weight loss. I’m sure ingesting exotic plants and seaweed will have some sort of benefit but losing huge amounts of weight won’t be one of them.

               Alli and C-Plex 60 appear to be different as both of them contain active ingredients that prevent the body absorbing and metabolising fats and carbohydrates respectively. Theoretically it sounds scientifically possible but does not come without financial risk! These websites are expertly written and they are so convincing that it seems almost too good to be true which will prey on vulnerable internet users.

               ‘The Pink Patch’ was another infamous internet phenomenon that had people sign up for a month's free trial of skin patches that contained seaweed extract. Needless to say, the cancellation process to that trial was harder than losing the weight it promised and many people found that they were being charged forty pounds a month!

               Weight loss is gradual and part of a changed life-style which is why so many people turn, in desperation, to these quick fixes. Nobody wants to hear that weight loss only comes about by following very healthy diets and lots of exercise but it’s the truth. 

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

From: Tomorrow's pharmacist blog

Students and preregistration trainees voice their opinions here

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.