Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Origins of the Straight Track Club

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

I have always been fascinated by the idea of ley lines. For those not familiar with the concept, ley lines are supposed lines across the landscape, usually linking ancient sites, such as prehistoric burial mounds and early churches.

Mostly the sites linked by ley lines are raised above the local level and can, therefore, be seen for some distance. Some people claim to be able to use dowsing rods to detect “energy streams” running along ley lines.

One famous ley line crosses London, passing through Charing Cross and down the Mall to Buckingham Palace, then through an impressive number of churches and the centres of two royal parks — Richmond Park and Bushy Park.

Another, perhaps less impressive, line is the Oxton Ley in Nottinghamshire. This line starts at the site of an iron age hill fort, passes roughly north through various churches and finally disappears somewhere in Yorkshire.

In the 1920s, an Englishman, Alfred Watkins, had a flash of inspiration while looking at an Ordnance Survey map of Herefordshire. He realised that many prehistoric sites and ancient churches fell on straight lines that ran for miles across the countryside. Watkins founded a society, the Straight Track Club, whose members investigated ley lines and located many of them, in all parts of Britain. The Straight Track Club ceased to exist in about 1949 as membership had declined.

Interest in ley lines returned in the 1960s, in company with a variety of mystics, UFO hunters and the like. This has tended to give ley hunting rather a bad name.

Could it be that ley lines really do exist, and are indeed prehistoric? Were they simply just that — straight lines between one place and another? In the absence of maps and other written records, oral directions to a traveller would be to follow the line of sight from one place to another.

Or could there be something more to them?

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

From: Beyond pharmacy blog

Take a look here for thoughts and musings beyond the pharmacy realm

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.