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People Behind the Medicines

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Working with some of the most brilliant minds in the field of solid oral dosage forms has really had a great impact on me.  Their seemingly endless knowledge, determination and hardworking nature have increased my aspirations of a future career in this type of industrial environment.  With the attrition rate of novel compounds ever increasing, the industry seems to be fighting an uphill battle.  Despite this, it is exceptionally clear, just how driven each individual is, with this gritty determination to see their product succeed is so refreshing.

The pharmaceutical industry has taken its fair share of criticism over the years, some of it unfortunately, deservedly so.  I may be biased in my views, however from an insider, seeing the scientists at work, the passion and care that is being asserted, truly makes me believe we have turned a corner.

Despite learning about the pharmaceutical industry, regulations and medicines development at university, I was surprised by the number restrictions and hoops required to jump through.  Obviously these regulations and restrictions are implemented to ensure safety, efficacy and quality, which are of paramount importance.  Seeing this however does allow the realisation of the difficulty of the task in hand, why so few compounds make it to market and why development is such a long process.

Whilst working in the pharmaceutical industry, it is inevitable the products you work on will die.  Some people may have worked for years on a compound, only for it to be shelved.  Some may go through their entire career without working on a compound which made it to market.  I think however that this inevitability of failure may be a real motivation – to achieve the sweet taste of success after such periods of failure.

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From: Tomorrow's pharmacist blog

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