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The Application of Knowledge

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A few weeks into the second semester and I’m already frustrated. Although I have not finished studying specific modules in finer detail, I am making assumptions regarding the purpose of specific learning outcomes. I feel this way for a number of reasons. One of them is that I find the science relatively dull (I am making judgements though – I may really with time enjoy it and blog about it!). However the main reason for this frustration is the lack of application to what I feel is my future pharmacy related path.  It’s understandable to think that studying pharmacy comes with having to learn relatively boring, uninteresting, and seemingly un-applicable subjects. I remember thinking that learning biochemical markers would be “pointless” and I remember almost being annoyed at the lecturer for boring me and my friends to tears. Having reached this level of the 4th year, I laughed with a friend about how wrong we were whilst diving into some clinical therapeutics today. It’s so funny because certain subjects are so applicable to pharmacy that when I was actually studying them I had no idea. The feeling of actually wanting to kick yourself is humiliating but is beneficial to reflection and learning because with this in mind I know I’m being hypocritical and inpatient. Therefore I am always trying to be more open-minded and more patient.   However, these feelings are due to an increasing amount of pressure. For some reason my mind is drifting towards application of the almost 4 years of studying. This includes how my knowledge will help benefit patients, will it be good enough, and more importantly am I good enough? I am sure I’m not the only person who feels this way with the pre-registration year slowly creeping up. As my pre-reg is hospital based, I’m anxious I will not be good enough clinically and even as an individual. Although this anxiety is not consciously active, it lingers around and flares up from time to time – especially whilst discussing the importance of DNA or how amazing biochemical technology will be in ‘X’ amount of years. Of course I know that the whole purpose of the pre-reg year is to gain that knowledge and understanding through application and hard work. It just cannot come fast enough at the minute. Nothing beats that feeling of applying previously taught knowledge into practise to obtain a positive result. In a healthcare professional sense the result is improving an individual’s health and well-being through advice or interventions.   So that’s about it really. The feeling of being clinically inadequate to provide care of potential patients in an upcoming possible future is preventing me from being motivated to study science with potentially limited application. I am such a hypocrite because I bet I’ll miss the science of DNA in a year’s time! I’m just glad I can laugh about it now.
All content is based on my own opinion – if the biochem lecturer ever reads this, your lecture was amazing and extremely relevant regardless of my silly, naive opinion at the time.

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From: Tomorrow's pharmacist blog

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