Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

sections

Premises regulation

Pharmacy regulator finds record keeping and cleanliness standards often not met

Failure to have a managed risk-assessment system is the top standard pharmacies are failing to meet under the prototype inspection model introduced by the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) in November 2013

Source: David Bagnall / Alamy

Community pharmacies most often need to make improvements in the areas of record-keeping, cleanliness and maintenance and management of medicines, says the General Pharmaceutical Council

A picture is emerging of the day-to-day practices that are influencing how pharmacies are ranked under the new premises inspection regime introduced by Britain’s pharmacy regulator, the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC).

Failure to have a managed risk-assessment system is the top standard pharmacies are failing to meet under the prototype inspection model introduced in November 2013.

Lack of safety monitoring and review is the second most common standard that pharmacies are falling down on, according to a report presented to the GPhC‘s council meeting on 11 June 2015.

The standard concerning medicines and devices — covering where and how the products are purchased, whether they are safe and fit for purpose and whether they are stored and supplied safely — is ranked as the third most common standard not being met by pharmacies.

The GPhC has also revealed the top five standards that are marked as “good” by inspectors; these are consistent with the standards most often identified as “not met”.

They are (in descending order): a managed risk-assessment system; a safety review system; a culture of openness, honesty and learning; safe and effective services; and having staff with the right skills and qualifications to deliver services.

“At the lower end of the scale we can see that improvements are most commonly required in the areas of record-keeping, cleanliness and maintenance and management of medicines,” says the report.

There has been a “small increase” in the number of pharmacies rated “good” since the guidance to inspectors was revised in February 2015 following criticism about the rankings, the report says. 

Citation: The Pharmaceutical Journal DOI: 10.1211/PJ.2015.20068769

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Supplementary images

  • Failure to have a managed risk-assessment system is the top standard pharmacies are failing to meet under the prototype inspection model introduced by the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) in November 2013

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.