Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Diabetes

England and Wales lag behind other countries for paediatric insulin pump use

International study shows insulin pump use in England and Wales was 30% of that in other countries.

Study shows insulin pump (pictured) use in England and Wales was 30% of that in other countries. Researchers say the lower level of pump use in England/Wales may be due to relatively restrictive national guidelines on their use in paediatrics

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Paediatric diabetes patients using insulin pumps had lower gylcated haemoglobin levels than injection users

Insulin pumps have been increasingly used in paediatrics in the past 15 years, but availability and support for these devices varies between countries. 

An international team of researchers compared data on 54,410 children and adolescents from three diabetes registries in the United States, Germany and Austria, and England and Wales. In all three registries, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were significantly lower among insulin pump users than injection users, but the rate of pump use in England and Wales was around only 30% of that in the other countries.

HbA1c levels were also highest in England/Wales at a mean of 8.9mmol/mol vs 8.3mmol/mol and 8.0mmol/mol in the United States and German/Austrian registries, respectively.

Writing in Diabetologia (online, 7 November 2015)[1], the researchers say the lower level of pump use in England/Wales may be due to relatively restrictive national guidelines on their use in paediatrics.

Citation: The Pharmaceutical Journal DOI: 10.1211/PJ.2015.20200107

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 1 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £138.50Buy now
  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 2 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £262.50Buy now
  • Patient Care in Community Practice

    Patient Care in Community Practice

    Patient Care in Community Practice is a unique, practical guide for healthcare professionals or carers. Covers a range of non-medicinal products suitable for use at home.

    £22.00Buy now
  • Clinical Pharmacokinetics

    Clinical Pharmacokinetics

    A practical guide to the use of pharmacokinetic principles in clinical practice. Includes case studies with questions and answers.

    £33.00Buy now
  • Strategic Medicines Management

    Strategic Medicines Management

    A practical guide to influencing the availability of medicines, and policies of their use. Focuses on the strategic elements of medicines management.

    £33.00Buy now

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Supplementary images

  • Study shows insulin pump (pictured) use in England and Wales was 30% of that in other countries. Researchers say the lower level of pump use in England/Wales may be due to relatively restrictive national guidelines on their use in paediatrics

Jobs you might like

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.