Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Pulmonary disease

Paradoxical bronchoconstriction occurs in 5% of COPD patients treated with beta-2-agonists

African–American patients with COPD are more likely to be affected by therapy-induced bronchoconstriction, study suggests.

African-American male patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Source: Andrey_Popov / Shutterstock.com

A paradoxical response was twice as common in African–American patients than in other racial groups, and was also associated with worse respiratory outcomes

Beta2 agonist drugs are used for their bronchodilatory properties in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), yet a paradoxical bronchoconstrictive effect, resulting in respiratory distress, occurs in some people.

The first systematic study of responses to beta2 agonists has identified paradoxical bronchoconstriction in 5% of nearly 10,000 patients with COPD. A paradoxical response was twice as common in African–American patients than in other racial groups, and was also associated with worse respiratory outcomes, including more severe dyspnoea, shorter six-minute walk distance and more frequent severe exacerbations.

“These findings might have implications for the use of beta2 agonists in some patients,” conclude Surya Bhatt, from the University of Alabama in Birmingham, and colleagues writing in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine (online, 10 September 2014).[1]

Citation: The Pharmaceutical Journal DOI: 10.1211/PJ.2014.20066436

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.