Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Biomarkers

Protein can assess and predict progression of Huntington’s disease

Researchers identify biomarker that offers a means of predicting and tracking neuronal damage in patients with Huntington’s disease.

Fluorescence light micrograph of a neuroblastoma cell (brain cancer cell) showing neurofilaments (intermediate filament protein)

Source: Dennis Kunkel Microscopy / Science Photo Library

Neurofilament light protein (NfL) concentrations in plasma offer a rapid and accessible means of assessing and predicting neuronal damage in people with Huntington’s disease, researchers find

Huntington’s disease is a slow, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by CAG repeat expansions in the HTT gene. No proven disease-modifying treatments currently exist.

Researchers carried out a retrospective analysis of carriers of the HTT mutation versus controls to investigate whether neurofilament light protein (NfL) in plasma could act as a prognostic marker of neurodegeneration and disease progression for Huntington’s disease.

They found that at baseline, concentrations of NfL in plasma were significantly higher in HTT mutation carriers than in controls (3.63 [SD 0.54] log pg/mL vs 2.68 [0.52] log pg/mL, P<0.0001). In addition, concentrations of NfL increased with advancing disease and with increasing CAG triplet repeat counts.

Reporting in The Lancet Neurology[1] (online, 7 June 2017), the researchers conclude that NfL concentrations in plasma offer a rapid and accessible means of assessing and predicting neuronal damage in people with Huntington’s disease and could have a potential role in facilitating the development of novel disease-modifying therapeutics and guiding treatment decisions in future.

Citation: Clinical Pharmacist DOI: 10.1211/CP.2017.20203052

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Supplementary images

  • Fluorescence light micrograph of a neuroblastoma cell (brain cancer cell) showing neurofilaments (intermediate filament protein)

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.