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Adverse drug effects

Proton pump inhibitors linked with chronic kidney disease

A growing body of evidence has linked proton pump inhibitors with acute kidney injury and now new research has also found links with chronic kidney disease.

Increasing evidence has linked proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with acute kidney injury and nephritis. In the image, light micrograph of a section of a kidney with kidney disease

Source: Steve Gschmeissner / Science Photo Library

Kidney disease (pictured) is being increasingly linked with the use of proton pump inhibitors, which treat acid reflux

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which treat acid reflux and indigestion, are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of drugs. However, increasing evidence has linked PPIs with acute kidney injury and nephritis. 

Now two studies presented at ASN Kidney Week in San Diego, California, suggest PPIs could be contributing to the growing prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). 

One study followed 10,482 people for 12–15 years and found those taking PPIs at baseline were 50% more likely to develop CKD than non-PPI users[1]. Meanwhile, a second study found that among 71,516 people, those who had ever taken PPIs were 10% more likely to develop CKD over a seven-year follow-up period than those who had never taken them[2]

The researchers say that PPIs, which are frequently prescribed off-label, should therefore only be used when necessary.

Citation: Clinical Pharmacist DOI: 10.1211/PJ.2015.20069640

Readers' comments (2)

  • One of the challenges is how to get patients off PPIs. The number of times we see patients taken off a PPI , only to end up with recurrence of original symptoms, and therefore needing to go back on a PPI.
    Perhaps better guidance on reducing doses over a longer period of time are needed

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • And the routine prescribing of PPIs to protect patients from the side effects of NSAIDs prescribed for chronic pain.

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Supplementary images

  • Increasing evidence has linked proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with acute kidney injury and nephritis. In the image, light micrograph of a section of a kidney with kidney disease

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