Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Dementia

Risk of dementia linked to level of wealth, study finds

Research into the link between wealth and dementia risk has found a positive association between lower wealth and dementia incidence.

PET scan, alzheimers disease brain scan

Source: Zephyr / Science Photo Library

A study has found the risk of developing dementia was 68% higher for those in the lowest wealth quintile than for those in the highest quintile

People with fewer financial resources in later life are at at a higher risk of dementia, results from a new study suggest.[1].

Researchers carried out a study of 6,220 individuals aged 65 years or older who were representative of the population in England. Of these, 7.4% were diagnosed with dementia between 2002–2003 and 2014–2015.

The researchers found a positive association between lower wealth and dementia incidence, independent of education and deprivation. The risk of developing dementia was 68% higher for those in the lowest wealth quintile than for those in the highest quintile.

Reporting in JAMA Psychiatry (online, 16 May 2018), the authors suggested that this could be because wealth represents a “gateway” to more mentally stimulating environments.

“Wealth could also be related to participants’ level of intelligence and their social hierarchy,” said Dorina Cadar, lead author of the study.

“This group of affluent people might be paying closer attention to what scientists suggest is the best way to stay healthy into old age; be socially active and culturally engaged, maintaining what we called cognitive reserve,” she added.

Citation: Clinical Pharmacist DOI: 10.1211/CP.2018.20205173

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Supplementary images

  • PET scan, alzheimers disease brain scan

Jobs you might like

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.