Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Hypertension

Sleeping tablets linked to increased antihypertensive use

Study results suggest that older people receiving hypertensive treatment who reported habitual use of sleeping tablets were more likely to require an increased number of antihypertensive medicines over time.

Older person's bedside with medicines

Source: Shutterstock.com

Researchers concluded that sleeping pill use might be an indicator of future needs of antihypertensive treatment

Older adults with hypertension who take sleeping tablets are more likely to receive an increased number of antihypertensive medicines over time, study results have shown (25 March 2019)[1].

The research used prospective data on 752 people aged 60 years and over who were receiving antihypertensive treatment. Their medicine use was assessed from 2008–2010 through to 2012–2013.

The results showed that, overall, 156 (20.7%) people received an increased number of antihypertensive medicines in the second time period compared with the first. The odds of this outcome were 85.0% higher in the 16.5% of people who self-reported habitual use of sleeping tablets. By contrast, there was no association between self-reported poor sleep quality or duration and antihypertensive treatment.

Noting that one in five people in the study received increased antihypertensive treatment at follow-up, the researchers said the findings were important given the link between polypharmacy and poor outcomes.

Writing in Geriatrics & Gerontology International, the authors said: “‘Sleeping pill use’ might be an indicator of future needs of antihypertensive treatment, and a warning indicator to investigate underlying sleep disorders or unhealthy lifestyles.” 

Citation: Clinical Pharmacist DOI: 10.1211/CP.2019.20206441

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 1 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £138.50Buy now
  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 2 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £262.50Buy now
  • Patient Care in Community Practice

    Patient Care in Community Practice

    Patient Care in Community Practice is a unique, practical guide for healthcare professionals or carers. Covers a range of non-medicinal products suitable for use at home.

    £22.00Buy now
  • Clinical Pharmacokinetics

    Clinical Pharmacokinetics

    A practical guide to the use of pharmacokinetic principles in clinical practice. Includes case studies with questions and answers.

    £33.00Buy now
  • Pharmaceutical Toxicology

    Pharmaceutical Toxicology

    Explains the methodology and requirements of pre-clinical safety assessments of new medicines. Includes registration requirements and pharmacovigilance.

    £40.00Buy now

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.