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Schizophrenia

Study finds disparity between antipsychotics in preventing schizophrenia relapses

There are big differences in antipsychotic agents in terms of failure of treatment and risk of rehospitalisation among patients with schizophrenia.

Jari Tiihonen, MD, PhD, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Source: Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

A team of researchers, led by Dr Jari Tiihonen, find substantial differences in the risk of rehospitalisation between treatments for schizophrenia

There is uncertainty whether some antipsychotics are better at preventing relapses in schizophrenia than others, which is in part because of nonrepresentative patient populations in randomised trials and the possibility of selection bias in observational studies.

In a study of 29,823 patients aged 16 to 64 years, researchers used national data from Sweden to compare antipsychotic efficacy, applying a method whereby each subject acts as their own control to eliminate the risk of selection bias.

Over a median follow-up of 6.9 years, monotherapy with long-term injectable antipsychotics, such as paliperidone (hazard ratio [HR] 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41–0.64),) and zuclopenthixol (HR 0.53, 95% CI, 0.48–0.57), as well as clozapine (HR 0.53, 95% CI, 0.48–0.58), were associated with the lowest risk of rehospitalisation. Long-acting injectable antipsychotics were also significantly more effective than their oral equivalents.

Reporting in JAMA Psychiatry[1] (online, 7 June 2017), the researchers say the results show that there are substantial differences in the risk of rehospitalisation between treatments for schizophrenia.

Citation: Clinical Pharmacist DOI: 10.1211/CP.2017.20203072

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  • Jari Tiihonen, MD, PhD, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

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