Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Bacterial infections

Study results show increased hydration can prevent recurrent cystitis

Results from a 12-month study of 140 women showed that increased water intake reduced the prevalence of cystitis, but researchers say more investigation is required.

Woman drinking water

Source: Shutterstock.com

Following a year-long study, researchers concluded that recurrent cystitis can be alleviated by increased water intake in women with a history of frequent recurrent cystitis who are low-volume fluid drinkers

Increased water intake can help prevent cystitis and reduce antibiotic use in women with recurrent infections who drink less than 1.5 litres of fluid a day, study results have shown[1].

A randomised trial involved 140 premenopausal women who had experienced at least three cystitis episodes in the previous year and normally drank less than 1.5 litres of fluid per day. They were randomly assigned to either continue with their normal fluid intake or to consume an additional 1.5 litres of water per day.

During the 12-month study, the results of which were published in JAMA Internal Medicine (online, 1 October 2018), those assigned to the increased water intake group experienced significantly fewer episodes of cystitis, at a mean of 1.7 compared with 3.2 in the control group. The mean number of antimicrobial regimens was also lower at 1.9 and 3.6, respectively.

Increased fluid intake is commonly advised for women with cystitis; however, there is a lack of published evidence to support the practice.

“Our data confirm the benefit of increased water intake in reducing the risk of recurrent cystitis in women with a history of frequent recurrent cystitis who are low-volume fluid drinkers,” the researchers said.

Future research should explore whether women at lower risk of cystitis or who already consume larger quantities of fluids can also benefit, they added.

Citation: Clinical Pharmacist DOI: 10.1211/CP.2018.20205727

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

Recommended from Pharmaceutical Press

  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 1 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £133.00Buy now
  • BNF and BNF for Children

    BNF and BNF for Children

    Now available as a 2 year print subscription to both the BNF and BNFC, ensuring you have the latest medicines information as it publishes and at a greatly reduced price.

    £252.00Buy now
  • International Research in Healthcare

    International Research in Healthcare

    Guidance for students or researchers undertaking a multi-centre research project in health services, medicines use and professional practice.

    £38.00Buy now
  • FASTtrack: Pharmacology

    FASTtrack: Pharmacology

    FASTtrack: Pharmacology is a study guide providing an account of drug action, as well as dealing with molecular pharmacology at a more advanced level.

    £25.00Buy now
  • Introduction to Pharmaceutical Calculations

    Introduction to Pharmaceutical Calculations

    Introduction to Pharmaceutical Calculations is an essential study aid for pharmacy students. The book contains worked examples and sample questions and answers.

    £33.00Buy now

Search an extensive range of the world’s most trusted resources

Powered by MedicinesComplete
  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Supplementary images

  • Woman drinking water

Jobs you might like

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.