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Ustekinumab may benefit Crohn’s patients when anti-TNF fails

By News team

Moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease that has been unresponsive to anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment may respond to ustekinumab, according to research in The New England Journal of Medicine (2012;361:1519).

In a phase II study funded by Janssen, 526 patients were randomised to receive intravenous ustekinumab — currently licensed to treat severe plaque psoriasis — or placebo for induction therapy (0–8 weeks), then subcutaneous ustekinumab or placebo maintenance (8–36 weeks).

Patients who received 6mg/kg ustekinumab for induction had a better response rate at week 6 than those who received placebo (39.7 per cent versus 23.5 per cent; P=0.005). Furthermore, patients who showed an initial response to ustekinumab had significantly higher rates of response and remission with ustekinumab during maintenance therapy (secondary endpoints).

Citation: The Pharmaceutical Journal URI: 11109925

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