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Beyond pharmacy blog

All posts from: September 2009

The fruit of the quince: the golden apple of antiquity

Posted by: Footler PJWed, 30 Sep 2009

Shine on harvest moon

Posted by: Footler PJWed, 30 Sep 2009

There is a full moon this weekend. At such times the moon’s energy is said to be at its strongest and full of magic power. It was believed that a child born during a full moon should live a long and healthy life. Then again, legends tell us that werewolves only emerge at the full moon as well.

Remembering the creator of possibly the finest guidebooks in the world

Posted by: Footler PJWed, 30 Sep 2009

I am sure many of you, like me, feel a quiver of excitement when opening a good map or guidebook for the first time. We can trace the contours of a mountain, follow the course of a river or seek out a quiet cove. Depending on our interests, we may make a list of museums to explore, churches to visit or bar opening times.

Our plethora of patron saints

Posted by: Bystander PJThu, 24 Sep 2009

You may remember that a year ago “Prospector” wrote a piece for this page about several patron saints of pharmacists — St John Leonardi, St Gemma Galgani, St Mary Magdalene and the twin saints Cosmas and Damian (PJ, 4 October, 2008, p403).

A day for minding our languages

Posted by: Bystander PJThu, 24 Sep 2009

Today, 26 September 2009, is the European Day of Languages — a Council of Europe initiative introduced in 2001 to celebrate language and cultural diversity. It aims to alert the public to the importance of language learning, to increase awareness and appreciation of all languages and to encourage lifelong language learning.

A wound healer and a cheese preserver

Posted by: Bystander PJThu, 24 Sep 2009

Shining light on marine life

Posted by: Prospector PJWed, 16 Sep 2009

Michael Faraday, an outstanding scientist

Posted by: Prospector PJWed, 16 Sep 2009

Michael Faraday, born 218 years ago on 22 September, was the son of a blacksmith. He received little formal education, yet went on to become the outstanding scientific lecturer of his time and his work laid the foundations for all subsequent electrotechnology.

The brainy bunch: Mensa and Prometheus

Posted by: Prospector PJWed, 16 Sep 2009

Brunel's unsung contribution to medicine

Posted by: Glow-worm PJWed, 9 Sep 2009

Next Tuesday, 15 September 2009, is the 150th anniversary of the death of the engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

Pineapple weed and its uses

Posted by: Glow-worm PJWed, 9 Sep 2009

Pineapple weed (Matricaria discoidea) was introduced to Britain from Oregon in the late 19th century and spread rapidly. It is now an abundant annual weed of waysides and waste places, its cone-shaped flower heads a familiar sight from June to September.

What is the purpose of sleep?

Posted by: Glow-worm PJWed, 9 Sep 2009

Almost all vertebrates require sleep, to a greater or lesser extent. Studies show that animals deprived of sleep can die sooner than those deprived of food, and sleep is thought to be an essential metabolic requirement.

Ye shall hear of wars and rumours of wars

Posted by: Merlin PJThu, 3 Sep 2009

Thursday 3 September was the 70th anniversary of the start of the 1939–45 war, and no doubt millions of words will have been written on the subject by mightier pens than Merlin’s. Merlin has another military anniversary to write about instead.

A humble railway vehicle that had a valiant role

Posted by: Merlin PJThu, 3 Sep 2009

After the 1914–18 war, Britain’s railways began to gear up for peacetime operations with the end of their wartime role as troop carriers. In 1919, the South Eastern and Chatham Railway introduced a new type of luggage van to carry passengers’ cases and trunks, and small items of freight, on long journeys. The van would run with all types of passenger rolling stock.

Always read the label

Posted by: Merlin PJThu, 3 Sep 2009

One of the most useful works of reference for Merlin when writing this column is Culpeper’s ‘Complete Herbal’. Merlin’s copy, far from being an original, is a paperback edition from the Wordsworth Reference Series of books published by Wordsworth Editions.

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