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BPSA conference: Pennine area

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The Pennine area BPSA conference took place this Saturday (17thNovember) at Manchester University, which boasted a sold out event with topspeakers. Annie Sellers – a fourth year pharmacy student at Manchester University –organised the successful event that was based on the topic of ‘the start oflife.’ It was great to see so many students turn up and listen to a range oflectures including one on premature labour by Kay Marshall; the head of the Schoolof Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at Manchester University. With lunchincluded, it gave everyone a boost of energy to take part in a CPPE workshopand debates such as ‘making it a legal requirement for children to have certainvaccinations’.

Theevent was very enjoyable and I am ashamed to admit it’s my first BPSAconference since the four years I have been a student! I’ll bet you’rewondering why I haven’t gone before, well I think most students, like me, willhave a range of excuses, ‘it’s too far away’, ‘I don’t have the money’ and ‘Idon’t want to give up my Saturday!’ Well it’s time to be converted. If you weregoing to lay in bed all day Saturday anyway, it would be much better to goalong to the conference because it certainly surprised me how much I did takeaway from it. Firstly, the lectures are not like university lectures becausethey’re on a topic that is more relevant to future practice, which can give agood insight into any potential areas of interest. For example, the talk onaseptic services for neonates by James Drinkwater, Chairman of the Pharmaceutical& Healthcare Sciences Society, showed an interesting area of workthat pharmacists could get involved with. The work shop was light-hearted butalso focused on some serious issues and case studies that allowed us to think,as pharmacists, what we would do in certain situations involved withsafeguarding children and vulnerable adults.

               Thedebates were certainly the best part of the day for me because you could argueyour ideas if you wanted or simply listen to what people had to say. It wasamusing that they often ended once the debate became quite heated!

               If Ihaven’t convinced you enough, there are even prizes to be won, which was a nicetouch to the day and actually once we qualify as professionals we will takepart in conferences like these as part of CPD. Finally, because the organisersand other students provide such a positive and engaging atmosphere you can’thelp but leave feeling inspired.

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