Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Glaswegian solidarity

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Glasgow, in my opinion, is a city of loving humanity, as witnessed last night.Today, I was planning to blog about the great success stories of Scotland in the field of medicine, especially being the fact that it is St Andrew’s Day.

But that blog entry (and tomorrow’s blog entry in addition) will now be postponed until next week, God willing.

The events in Glasgow approximately 24 hours ago have overshadowed this whole St Andrew’s weekend. With lives lost and many people’s lives turned upside down, as well as making major changes to other plans, I have decided to dedicate this blog post today to the victims of the disaster that took place last night in the city centre, the people of Glasgow and to the emergency services plus everyone else who helped those affected by last night’s awful events.

I think all of the people of Glasgow - civilians, Police Scotland, the Scottish Ambulance Service, Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, the National Health Service, in fact everyone who was involved in supporting the care of all those people affected by the tragic events that took place in Scotland’s biggest city - deserve enormous credit for the way they handled themslves and reacted to the adverse events. Rather than panic, they instantaneously did what was right to save as many lives as possible and minimise the suffering during what was a horrific time.

Dr Jennifer Armstrong, Medical Director of NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, confirmed earlier today, without going into individual cases, that those who were admitted to hospital suffered from chest and head injuries, lacerations and long bone fractures. Tonight, eight people have tragically lost their lives and 32 people have been injured, after a Police Scotland helicopter crashed into a well known pub called The Clutha. 

From a pharmacy point of view, nobody should forget the heroic work all health professionals have carried out across health services and are continuing to carry out at this time. Many of those health professionals will be pharmacists and their input is very important. They are heroes, just like everyone else who has aided in the support of minimising any suffering and pain in the aftermath of last night’s incident.

I hope that you can respect my decision and, on a separate note, want to thank all of you sincerely for your comments throughout the week with regard to my special week of daily blogging on the Pharmaceutical Journal online.

Rest In Peace to those who lost their lives over this last 24 hours. 

————————————————————————————————————————————————

From BBC News, “Glasgow helicopter crash: Police appeal for Clutha tragedy video”: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-25165894 

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

From: Pharmacy practice and profession blog

Here you will find blog posts about the profession and on issues that affect practice

Blog Archive

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.