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Obesity may increase the risk of osteoporosis

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Overweight and obesity have many risks, but osteoporosis has not traditionally been considered to be one of them. While no one would have advised a person to become overweight to reduce the risk of fragile bones, being thin was nevertheless considered a risk. However, the findings of new research indicate that excessive liver and muscle fat, as well as fat round the middle, are detrimental to bone.

US researchers have published a study in the journal Radiology in which they examined 106 men and women who were obese based on body mass index. They used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure levels of fat in the bone marrow, liver and muscle. Higher levels of bone marrow fat were associated with increased risk of fracture.

The researchers suggest that bone marrow fat makes bones weak. They also say that blood triglyceride levels were correlated with bone marrow fat, possibly because they stimulate the osteoclasts, a type of cell that breaks up bone tissue.

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From: Beyond pharmacy blog

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