Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

Obesity: whose responsibility is it anyway?

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Coca-Cola has recently released a two-minute advertisement in the US addressing the issue of obesity. If you ignore the cheesy film and soundtrack, there are bits of information worth teasing out from the ad.

In the video, Coca-Cola claims it offers 180 low- and no-calorie beverages out of more than 650 beverage products. Also, it emphasised that it is rolling out smaller calorie-controlled portions (I bet they cost more to the consumer though, but I digress). The calorie content is printed in front of all its bottles and cans as well.

However, the message that Coca-Cola tries to drive home is that: “Beating obesity will take action by all of us, based on one simple, common sense fact: all calories count, no matter where they come from, including Coca-cola and anything else with calories. And if you eat and drink more calories than you burn off, you’ll gain weight.”

People armed with knowledge have the power to take control of their health. As health professionals it is easy for us to understand the consequences of consuming too many calories, including sugar and fats. So, at the risk of stating the obvious, Coca-Cola attempts to make an important point about the cause of obesity: eat and drink too much of anything and it cannot be good for you. Many critics say this is damage control from a corporate giant which has used every method to promote its drinks to consumers. But I think the main message in this video is educational and useful.

Although corporate responsibility is important (and I agree super-sized cups are an irresponsible way of selling fizzy drinks to people, so thumbs up to New York City for banning the sale of these in restuarants), the general public needs to take responsibility for their health as well. If people know and understand what causes weight gain and obesity but choose to continue to consume too much and exercise too little, can we really continue to put the blame solely on corporate companies? After all, an individual has to make a choice to consume calorific products in an unbalanced way.

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

From: Pharmacy practice and profession blog

Here you will find blog posts about the profession and on issues that affect practice

Blog Archive

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.