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Summer hospital placement: shadowing a pre-reg on a ward

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I met with a pre-registration pharmacist who was in her final week of the job.  We went up to an escalation elderly ward which was busy and disorganised.  The ward didn’t have a specific consultant because any doctor could send their patients there (the ward was not permanent).  The first job on arrival was to match up patients to beds on the patient summary chart, for example, Mrs X may have been on bed A4.  This makes it a lot easier when discussing patients with other healthcare providers.Many of the patients were waiting to be discharged to one of the numerous care homes in the area. Each care home requires different provisions to be made and the hospital has a list detailing all these specific requirements.  On this ward I noticed a lot of the pre-reg’s time was spent looking for drug charts!  The pre-reg had to teach a doctor how to write a CD TTA (controlled drug to take away) as this has to be done in a specific way in order for it to be supplied to pharmacy.On the drug charts and one stop medicines requests  (medicines for use on the wards) dots and dashes are used to indicate numbers rather than just using numbers as handwriting is often messy or rushed.  A one stop is a where a drug request, based on the patient’s drug chart, is made by a pharmacy technician/pre-reg (this needs to be validated by a pharmacist) or by a pharmacist.  To save sending the drug chart down to pharmacy the relevant information for a request is transcribed onto a form which is then sent to pharmacy.  To give pharmacy a time frame indicating how urgent the medication is the person requesting the medication will put a time it is due by or write ASAP if it is needed urgently.

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