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The start of being a pharmacist

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My name appeared on the GPhC register on the 1stof September. This date will always hold a special meaning to me as itsignifies the beginning of my career as a pharmacist. I feel extremely proud ofwhat I have achieved after five years of studying.

I decided to take a bit of a break after I finished mypre-registration training in August. I felt like I worked very hard during thepast year – not just with revising for the exam, but also from working on myaudit, completing performance standards and creating seemingly endlesspresentations for pharmacy team meetings, LPE&T study days and regional study afternoons. Thisbreak was much needed and now I am more than ready to begin my career as apharmacist.

As I completed my pre-registration year at a mental healthhospital, I decided I wanted to work at a hospital where I could develop myexperience in general medicine. Hospital pharmacy was always where my heartwas. My new Trust will provide the perfect programme for me as a rotationalpharmacist. I am currently having my induction and being trained by going onthe wards with another pharmacist and being introduced to all of the Trust policies.I have realised that every hospital has their own way of doing things withdifferent procedures. I therefore have lots to catch up on!

I have found that I am still looking up new medicines that Icome across, still checking doses and interactions I am unsure of and, slowlybut surely, becoming accustomed to labelling medicines on a different labellingsystem to what I was used to; who knew it would be so confusing to remember allthe short codes that are needed to create a label?

Overall, as a newly qualified pharmacist, I know there arestill things I have to learn. I have come to the realisation that my studyingdoes not end and seeing my name on the register does not signify an end to mylearning. I will be starting the diploma in general pharmacy practice which Iam looking forward to and feel will be of great benefit to my professionaldevelopment. I also need to look out for opportunities to do CPDs while also lookingup anything new that I come across on the wards or in dispensary to keep on topof things. For the next stage of my pharmacy journey, I want to aim to alwaysbetter myself as a pharmacist.

 

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