Cookie policy: This site uses cookies (small files stored on your computer) to simplify and improve your experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information please take a look at our terms and conditions. Some parts of the site may not work properly if you choose not to accept cookies.

Join

Subscribe or Register

Existing user? Login

The Three Numbers of Pharmacy

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Three. Eighty-five.Two thousand and twelve. Those are the three important numbers that have theirown individual meaning to me. Three for my third year of studying pharmacy, eighty-fivefor the amount of drugs I need to learn for this year (I definitely need asuper drug to increase my brain capacity!) and two thousand and twelve for theyear I graduate, what all my studying is centred on.  

I could never havepredicted the impact pharmacy would have on my life. Since my first day of thisdegree I have been converted to a world of medicines, to a point where I nowfind it strange to actually not havepharmacy incorporated into my life. After some thought, I came to realise thatthe correct term to use was ‘dedicated’. In my opinion, taking on a pharmacycourse is distinctly different to taking on any other course and, as a student,you notice this from day one.

I still remember asclear as yesterday when I started my first year of pharmacy and used to look upat the third years with awe and respect for getting that far in this undoubtedlychallenging course. Now I am in their place, questioning how I did it andpraising myself for being better than I thought at pharmacy – a great feeling. Ihave found pharmacy to not only be a degree that you will be proud ofachieving, but also a learning experience in yourself; professionalism, many,many exams and the pressure of placements. Then comes the part where youunintentionally end up reading anything related to drugs in the news…

A recent BBC newsarticle told of how my very own university, the University of East Anglia,found a gene that helps cancer spread. This gene leads a specific inhibitor tobreak down. Without this inhibitor, cancer quickly spreads. Blocking this genetherefore potentially means stopping cancer from spreading and so could bringto light possible new treatments for cancer.

After reading this, Ifelt proud for being part of a new generation of pharmacists. I wondered whatdrugs would be discovered and put onto the market for when I am a practisingpharmacist, and then thought of any new drugs I would be dispensing andadvising patients on in the future. How would healthcare change because of newand more advanced medicines? Only the future will tell.

Have your say

For commenting, please login or register as a user and agree to our Community Guidelines. You will be re-directed back to this page where you will have the ability to comment.

  • Print
  • Share
  • Comment
  • Save
  • Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF

Newsletter Sign-up

Want to keep up with the latest news, comment and CPD articles in pharmacy and science? Subscribe to our free alerts.