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Training for Pharmacy Clyde-siders

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We are now on the second of three training sessions for our pharmacy Clyde-siders. The first was a general orientation in the new Emirates Arena with about 4,000 volunteers from every functional area. The sun even shone!

 

Orientation Training

 

There was a bit of razzmatazz with flashing lights, local celebrities and demonstrations of many of the sports. My seat was beside where the pole vault action was taking place; it looked terrifying and amazing in equal measure. The session provided a basic overview of the Games, the sports and the range of roles that are required to make the Games work. Before becoming involved, I wouldn’t have thought about the need lay miles of cable for broadcasting and the IT required for finish line technology, never mind have a team of people to alter uniforms and apply make up for the medal ceremonies.

 

Alan Wells spoke about his earliest experience in the Commonwealth Games; a volunteer in Edinburgh at the 1970 Games. I wonder if he imagined then that he would compete in 1978 and 1982 and win a total of 6 medals; 4 golds, a silver and a bronze. I can be confident that I won’t be following his example and competing for Scotland in future events...

 

Day two is role specific training and, for the medical services, was held at Hampden which is the location for the athletics competition and the closing ceremony. There are volunteers from medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, dentistry, optometry, radiology, sports massage, imaging, the ambulance service and podiatry as well as first aiders and pharmacists.

 

Dr James Robson, doctor with the Scotland Rugby Team and the British and Irish Lions, spoke about the challenges of treating injured players on the field and providing rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment with the world watching. That’s not something that pharmacists will be involved in, but an eye-opener to some of the difficulties of practising in unusual locations. Other sessions cover clinical scenarios, thinking about the implications of emergency treatment with prohibited medicines and how to safeguard patient confidentiality while respecting the relationship athletes have with their team coaches.

 

I’m really looking forward to our final training session mid June which gives people their first view of the athlete village and the Polyclinic where we will be working.

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