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Venue specific training

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Last week I had my final games maker training event, called "Venue specific training".

As the name suggests this was an opportunity for each games maker to familiarise themselves with the venue that they will be working in. My venue is  Royal Holloway University, one of three Olympic and Paralympic villages. Its title is the "Rowing and Canoe Sprint Village" and this is where the polyclinic for Eton Dorney is based.

On entering the grounds you first get sight of this majestic and spectacular building. But it's only as you get closer to it that it's true beauty and history can be fully appreciated.

It was founded in 1879 by the wealthy philanthropist Thomas Holloway as a college for female students only.

This village will provide accommodation and facilities for athletes and team officials participating in the rowing and flatwater canoe events at Eton Dorney. There will be around 1,200 athletes and team officials accommodated at this village.

As part of our training event we were given a guided tour of our site.

We were then separated into our specific lines of expertise and I have a chance to see the polyclinic! The pharmacy is part of a multidisciplinary team, including dentists, primary care staff and physiotherapists. The pharmacy was smaller than a conventional dispensary but contained all the equipment needed for pharmacists to do their job.

Prior to this session we were all asked to complete an online training programme for the dispensary software. A trainer was then on hand to give us any additional training that we needed during our tour. Mark Stuart (superintendent pharmacist at London 2012) was on hand to answer any questions or concerns that we might have. In all it was an informative and fun day.

Many of us pharmacist games makers had now started to build firm friendships. These friendships should serve us well at the Games as we will be relying on each for support, advice and most importantly knowing our success is directly dependent on our harmony as a team.

It's hard to believe that this was now our last training session, the next time we will see each other will be when the Olympic Village opens!

 

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From: Beyond pharmacy blog

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