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PJ Online | PJ Letters: Onlooker

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The Pharmaceutical Journal
Vol 269 No 7226 p783
30 November 2002

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Onlooker

Excalibur was pulled from a stone

From Mr A. P. Bolt, MRPharmS

I beg to differ with Stephen Jones (PJ, 23 November, p746) about the origins of Excalibur.

According to some the name Excalibur comes from the Latin ex calibre (ultimately from the Arabic kalib) "from the mould". It was an early bronze age sword made by pouring molten bronze into a stone mould and so ultimately came "from the stone". Such swords signalled the beginning of the bronze age. They were rare and prized by kings and great warriors.

The Arthurian legend has become so mixed that it is unclear if there were two swords, or one sword with two mythical origins.

Alistair Bolt
Norwich

 

Correspondence about Excalibur is now closed
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