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Headline

With no control on student numbers, tomorrow’s pharmacists will have a bleak future

Comment

I'd just like to challenge an assertion in this debate that is often made, but which is highly unlikely to be the whole truth: "It is expected that this number will continue to grow over the coming years due to a number of new schools of pharmacy opening in the past few years." Although new schools obviously will add to the number of graduates, established schools have also changed their intakes substantially (sometimes more than the entire intake of some new schools). Until such time as the exact proportions contributed from each are known it is more accurate to say that: "It is expected that this number will continue to grow over the coming years due to a number of new schools of pharmacy opening in the past few years and expansion of existing schools' intakes." In the US, who have similar pressures, expansion of established schools was responsible for the biggest growth in pharmacy graduates. It would be interesting to find the figures for the UK. Dr Anthony Cox Declaration of Conflict of Interest: I am an academic teaching at a new school of pharmacy.

Posted date

5 NOV 2014

Posted time

23:11

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