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Emergency oxygen treatment is used two million times a year by ambulance services, and almost one in five hospital patients in the UK are being treated with oxygen at any one time.

Oxygen therapy: emergency use and long term treatmentSubscription

Emergency oxygen treatment is used two million times a year by ambulance services, and almost one in five hospital patients in the UK are being treated with oxygen at any one time.

People on oral anticoagulation therapy can successfully self-monitor and even self-manage their international normalised ratio (INR) using commercially available devices, research shows. In the image, micrograph of a blood clot

Study finds favour in self-monitoring for patients on oral anticoagulantsSubscription

People using oral blood thinning therapy such as warfarin can successfully monitor and manage their own international normalised ratio (INR) using commercially available devices, research shows.

The use of antipsychotic medication by adolescents and young people aged between 13 and 24 has risen in the US. Depression was the most common diagnosis for 19 to 24 year olds who received antipsychotics

Rise of antipsychotic drug use in 13–24 year olds in United StatesSubscription

–The use of antipsychotic drugs by young people aged 13–24 years has risen in the United States between 2006 and 2010 but has fallen in those aged between 1–12 years of age, according to research published in JAMA Psychiatry. 

The pharmaceutical industry has vowed to continue its supply of medicines to Greece, but there are other potential problems if the country leaves the eurozone. In the image, protesters march down the streets of Athens

Greek debt crisis will not affect supply of medicines, pharmaceutical companies saySubscription

Pharmaceutical companies will provide a constant supply of medicines to the people of Greece through the financial crisis, says the Hellenic Association of Pharmaceutical Companies.

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The UK’s medicines safety watchdog has given nivolumab a positive scientific opinion under the EAMS as a treatment for lung cancer (NSCLC) after prior chemotherapy in adults. In the image, micrograph of a cancerous tumour in the lung

Nivolumab granted positive scientific opinion under UK early access schemeSubscription

Nivolumab, a new lung cancer drug, has been granted a positive scientific opinion by the UK medicines safety regulator under the Early Access to Medicines Scheme (EAMS).

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Complete the CPD modules and receive your certificate from The Pharmaceutical Journal.

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons for using antibiotics in both primary and secondary care. Escherichia coli (micrograph pictured) is still the most common causative organism

Urinary tract infection: management in elderly patientsSubscription

Around 10% of older people, and almost a third of care home residents, develop a urinary tract infection each year.

This article will use theoretical case studies to illustrate common problems associated with contraception and treatment options to consider.

Hormonal contraception: practice-based case studies Subscription

The wide range of hormonal contraception available means that patients can present with a range of problems or concerns that require advice or assessment

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Challenging behaviour is any non-verbal, verbal of physical behaviour which makes it difficult to deliver good care safely. It includes grabbing, biting, punching, or self-injury. In the image, an aggressive patient is restrained to a hospital bed

Tranquillisation of patients with aggressive or challenging behaviourSubscription

Although never the first option, rapid tranquillisation may be required to ensure patient and staff safety when a patient exhibits violent behaviour.

Warts and verrucas are common viral skin infections, affecting around 7–12% of the population at any one time, and are more common in children. They are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). In the image, micrograph of a common wart

Warts and verrucas: assessment and treatmentSubscription

Lesions caused by human papilloma virus often do not require treatment, but need to be assessed to rule out more serious conditions.

With more obesity drugs having been withdrawn in recent years than licensed, we look at the current pharmacological options that can be used in addition to lifestyle changes. In the image, scanning electron micrograph of fat tissue

Obesity: current and emerging drug treatmentsSubscription

The prevalence of obesity has doubled worldwide since 1980, but a range of new treatments are being introduced to help patients lose weight.

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A new EU system enables the public to verify websites that sell medicines. But it will only work if people know about it and want to use a legal site. In the image, logo of the EU online pharmacy verification

Public needs to understand the risks of purchasing medicines onlineSubscription

A new EU system enables the public to verify websites that sell medicines, but it will only work if people know about it and want to use a legal site.

David Sackett, pictured, died in May 2015 aged 80. He leaves behind the important legacy of evidence-based medicine

David Sackett (1934–2015) Subscription

By

Sackett’s tendency to question conventional therapeutic wisdom made him unpopular among some colleagues, but he leaves behind the important legacy of evidence-based medicine.

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In 2016, pre-registration trainees will sit the General Pharmaceutical Council’s (GPhC) registration assessment in a new format. This article explains how tutors can help prepare their trainees throughout the year. In the image, a female student

How tutors can prepare students for the new GPhC registration assessmentSubscription

In 2016, pre-registration trainees will sit the General Pharmaceutical Council’s (GPhC) registration assessment in a new format. Johanne Barry, who writes assessment questions for the GPhC, explains how tutors can make sure their trainees are ready.

When writing a research proposal you should produce a concise, clear summary. Putting together a proposal can take a considerable amount of time, so you need to be able to justify investing your time and that of your research team (pictured)

How to prepare a proposal for pharmacy researchSubscription

A research proposal is often necessary to secure the required funding or resources. Cathy Geeson explains what to consider when putting a proposal together.

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Breaking the cycle of heroin addiction. With rates of heroin addiction stubbornly high, there is still debate about how best to treat those hooked on the drug.

Heroin abuse: breaking the cycleSubscription

With rates of heroin addiction stubbornly high, there is still debate about how best to treat those hooked on the drug.

All features

Researchers have developed an assay to monitor the effects of drug candidates on endoplasmic reticulum (pictured) function

Assay screens compounds that target the endoplasmic reticulumSubscription

Researchers have developed an assay to monitor the effects of compounds on endoplasmic reticulum function, finding a potential drug candidate for type 2 diabetes.

Menopausal women frequently report cognitive deficits. A new therapy to address these deficits may be on the horizon, with promising early results for the psychostimulant lisdexamfetamine, which is used to treat attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder

Promising early results for lisdexamfetamine as treatment for symptoms of menopauseSubscription

The psychostimulant lisdexamfetamine could help women who experience cognitive deficits associated with the menopause.

Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus and one such agent, liraglutide, has recently been approved for use as an anti-obesity drug. In the image, an obese woman walks on the pavement

Liraglutide has positive effects on bone metabolism in obese womenSubscription

Data on liraglutide’s effects on bone metabolism support its use as an anti-obesity therapy, say researchers.

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Drug breweries of the future

Genetically modified yeasts could soon provide a source of opiates and other drugs previously only obtainable from plants.

Anaemia is the most common nutritional problem in the world. Adding a fish-shaped piece of iron to cooking pots has helped to tackle the problem in Cambodia. In the image, three iron fishes provided by the Lucky Iron Fish company

Tackling anaemia with iron fish

Anaemia is the most common nutritional problem in the world. Adding a fish-shaped piece of iron to cooking pots has helped to tackle the problem in Cambodia.

Video microscope to avert life-threatening serious adverse drug reaction

A new smartphone-based microscope can help to identify the presence of one species of parasitic worm when a patient is being treated for another, to help prevent drug complications.

Treating onion skin cells with sulphuric acid and gold allow them to be used as a muscle simulator. Onions pictured

Onion skin cells make an effective muscle actuator

Treating onion skin cells with sulphuric acid and gold allow them to be used as a muscle simulator.

High heels shown to be high risk

They may look fantastic, but evidence shows that wearing high heels is bad for your health.

Other blogs

Pharmaceutical Care Award winners 2015 discuss their primary care projectVideo

The winners of the Pharmaceutical Care Award 2015 discuss their primary care project.

Pharmaceutical Care Awards 2015 audience choice winnersVideo

The audience choice winners explain why their Pharmaceutical Care Awards project should be replicated.

Your RPS

Successful representation is a two-way processSubscription

I write in response to Sid Dajani’s call on Twitter to rethink the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) Pharmacy Board elections (The Pharmaceutical Journal 2015;294:661). I was a member of the Transitional Committee established to develop a modern “fit-for-purpose” RPS. We spent a long time debating the governance of the professional body. We agreed the national boards needed individuals exposed to different areas of pharmacy.

Policymakers may interpret evidence differentlySubscription

I read with interest the article by Stephen Robinson published in The Pharmaceutical Journal (2015;294:638) in which it is advocated that the next generation of pharmacists “must embed research into practice”.

Other correspondence

Pharmaceutical Care Award winners 2015 discuss their primary care projectVideo

The winners of the Pharmaceutical Care Award 2015 discuss their primary care project.

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Special report

Pharmaceutical Care Awards 2015

Pharmaceutical Care Awards 2014

A closer look at all the finalist pharmaceutical care projects that were presented at the 23rd annual Pharmaceutical Care Awards 2015 held on 18 June in London. The awards recognise innovation and good practice in pharmaceutical care. They are jointly organised by The Pharmaceutical Journal and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, and are supported by GlaxoSmithKline.

Read the special report

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Reader's comment

The ongoing negotiations in a similar deal, the Transatlantic Trade & Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the US and EU are also being held in secret are something we in the UK should be very wary about. Intellectual property and medicinal regulation are also being discussed which means we should take interest but the lack of attention in the mainstream media and clandestine nature of the talks prove there are things the lobbyists and negotiators don't want us to know about.

Mark Bury Free trade agreements play a dangerous game with public health